12 Must Do Items When You Start a New Job

It’s been a stressful month as you all know but I do have news! I have switched jobs and am now working as an HR Manager at a new job. Although I have changed in jobs and industries, a lot of the past HR knowledge that I’ve brought with me still applies. Thank you for all of your support, without my loyal readers, I wouldn’t be gaining all this additional knowledge.

So what should you do when starting a new job?

  1. Bring all your forms and official paperwork your first day including any documentation establishing your identity. Or a voided check to start your direct deposit.
  2. E-mail your HR person or your manager with any questions about your first day. There may be some new paperwork.
  3. Read your Employee Handbook! (Yes, I know it’s a billion pages, but trust me, handbooks are written for a reason.) The handbook will have all the rules including behavior, codes of conduct, dress code, leave (including bereavement, disability, and pregnancy leave).
  4. Do the commute, and figure how much time it takes to get there. It would be the worst impression to be late your first day.
  5. In addition to number 4, start creating a sleep schedule that matches your new job especially if you have to commute further.
  6. During the first 2 weeks, of any job, the best thing any employee can do is learn as much about the business as possible. Learn how the industry works, learn how different processes work, and learn who does what. Luckily, it’s the first 2 weeks, so any questions that you ask can be attributed to your learning process.
  7. Bring a notebook with you and meet with different people within your organization. Take notes so that you remember names and any advice they may have.
  8. Don’t worry if you don’t know the answer to something and don’t pretend you do. Instead ‘fess up that you don’t know and say you’ll find out.
  9. Practice power moves before any major meeting or any meeting. According to social psychology Amy Cuddy, posture can make a huge difference in how you feel in terms of confidence.
  10. Start putting processes in place to organize everything. If there’s a process in place for how to organize your e-mail, for example, then later on when you take on more tasks, you’ll naturally be more efficient. Create rules for where mail should automatically go. Set up signatures in Outlook of repeat e-mails you send.
  11. Disclose any pre-planned family vacations, especially if you haven’t done so already.
  12. Relax! Be yourself, your new employers saw something they liked about you in the interview and if you pretend to be something you’re not the first week, it will be harder to pretend as time goes on.

So, there are my tips to be highly successful at any new job. Good luck everyone!

But, again, what do I know? I’m…

~Just the HR Girl

How to Get Your Resume Noticed in an Increasingly Competitive World

It’s a tough market to find a job, the competition is fierce and the college degree is simply not worth what it used to.  According to a study done by the Young Invincibles Organization, “Millennial net wealth is half as much as Baby Boomers when they were young adults; wages have also declined 20 percent for today’s young workers.” This means that millennials may never have the financial success that their parents have. Click here to read more on other findings by the same study.  And it’s only getting tougher.

Although young Americans today are increasingly well-educated, the same group of young Americans who have a Bachelor’s degrees are earning just slightly more on average than young Americans who had no college degree in 1989. Take into account that the average 2016 college graduate “has $37,172 in student loan debt” and rising, these become very troubling statistics.

So what is a modern jobseeker to do?

Watch the video of how executives and other hiring managers view resumes today:

And here’s the thing, every HR person who has been bombarded by hundreds of resume from multiple sources (LinkedIn, Indeed, Monster, Simplyhired, ZipRecruiter, company website, recruiters, etc…) can attest to, there’s no time to read every resume. At most, your resume would get a 5-10 second glance, if you’re lucky.

So how do you get an overwhelmed, overworked HR manager to spend the extra 10 seconds on your resume and pull it out of the pile?

If you can get your resume past the Applicant Tracking System (ATS) implemented by most companies today, make sure your resume matches the job description. When we scan resumes for an Accounting role, we’re looking for someone who has done most of the job responsibilities before. When you write your resume, do not just write what you did. Stocking inventory is not applicable to an accounting position, unless you’re applying for a position that specifically mentions stocking inventory. For more information, I would highly suggest checking out Modern Career Advice’s free video on resumes and conversion rates. Video 4 of 7

So what happens if you’ve bounce from Marketing to Sales, and are now working in HR?

That’s not an issue! But as an applicant, you must decide what you plan on doing next.

Skip the objective, it’s wasting valuable real estate on your resume. Instead, focus on writing bullet points that are pertain to the new position that you’re looking for.

But what do I know? I’m…

~Just the HR Girl

Bereavement Leave: HR and Loss

When the call comes, it’s an unexpected call. It’s the kind of call that you would dread getting in the middle of the night at 3 a.m. because you already know when you pick up the phone it is going to be bad news.

I was the unfortunate recipient of one of these calls last month and it really opened my eyes to the issues surrounding bereavement and how frightening these situations can be. How a supervisor or HR contact handles this situation could be critical to how the relationship between employee/employer progresses years into the future or create a sour note that envelopes the entire relationship.

To give some background, my family resides in a completely different country. I got a call saying my grandmother was very ill but they didn’t think I would make it in time. After receiving this upsetting news, I immediately looked for flights, called my supervisor to explain the situation, and took the 14-hour flight the next day. I was gone over a week and a half.

How should an HR professional handle something like this?

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Day Without Immigrants: Dealing with Protests

Protests impact businesses. There’s no arguing that.

Everyone today will be affected by the immigrant protests in some way, whether it’s noticing that there is a strange pattern in traffic, finding an empty desk at work, not being able to go to your favorite restaurant, or hearing about it on the news.

Originally the protest started with having undocumented immigrants protest by staying home from work, not attending school, not going shopping, not eating out, not going to restaurants etc… However, many people who are related to immigrants are choosing to protest as well.

With all of the protests, employers are beginning feel the stress of people who are protesting affect their businesses and bottom line. After all, business must still go on.

So, how should HR professionals deal with the protests?

Here are some tips and tricks to keep yourself out of trouble:

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Try Before You Hire: The Week Long Interview

As a HR Generalist, recruiting is one of the hardest things that you will do. In fact, it’s so difficult, it’s oftentimes split up into a separate Recruiting role. And it’s not even finding the qualifications either, it’s trying to find the right person who is the perfect fit with everyone. Even if everything on paper was perfect, great education, wonderful experiences, clean background check, spot on recommendations, it’s still no guarantee that the placement or hiring of a new person is going to work out.

And the stakes are 10 times higher when you’re working in a startup environment where person may have to wear 20 different hats, how do you figure who will thrive and who might go off the deep end?

So how do you people find the best people?

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Dealing with Hazard Communication: The Basics

Hazard Communication Training 101

Nicknamed: HazCom

So, OSHA has decided to drop in and you’re in a pickle because as far as you know, you “think” everything is up-to-date. Where do you start and why on earth is this an HR problem?

Safety is such a large part of a manufacturing environment, this could probably be its own 30 book collection of posts. But in the interest of time and saving your sanity, here’s the quick and dirty.

What is HazCom?

HazCom is a program that is run under the United States Department of Labor and enforced by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The program is geared to the idea that all employees have the right to know what hazardous chemicals they are using and handling.

OSHA has now adopted the Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) per the United Nations as part of their system of classifying, labeling, and maintaining data on hazardous chemicals.

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DANGER – HazCom vs HazMat Training 

So, I had a lovely surprise to my day today. The Toxics Management Division decided that they wanted to drop in and do a Hazardous Materials Inspection and Violation Report.

Needless to say, I’ve never worked in a manufacturing industry before, so imagine my surprise when they informed me that I was in charge of walking the person through it. But I’m just the HR girl, and apparently it suddenly became my responsibility since my Operations Manager was gone.

There are over 1000s of codes on what could or could not be a violation but let’s go over a very simple Human Resources one with a quick fix.

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5 Things We Take for Granted at Work

Two and a half weeks ago, I went to watch Hidden Figures it was a great movie. However, from an HR perspective, the movie is phenomenal. Hidden Figures is movie based on three African American women who worked for NASA and their contributions to NASA.

The setting is in 1961.

For anyone who works in HR in the United States, you’ll notice the date is a full three years BEFORE the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Title VII.

In the new age of company lunches, nap pods, and other enticing benefits, we never think about things that we take for granted so here are some of the moments in the movie that really rang true.

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